By Mike Ullery - mullery@dailycall.com



Mike Ullery | Daily Call A three-photo composite image of Monday’s solar eclipse as seen from the John Johnston Farm & Indian Agency north of Piqua. The center image is the peak in our area where the moon covered 89 percent of the sun. The eclipse began at 1:02 p.m. with totality being reached at 2:27 p.m.


Mike Ullery | Daily Call A single image showing the moon passing between the earth and sun, minutes before the eclipse reached its peak in southwest Ohio on Monday.


PIQUA — Monday was possibly the most-anticipated day across America, maybe ever. The event that was dubbed “the Great Eclipse” took place in the skies overhead as millions of viewers went outdoors, necks craned skyward, as they watched one of the most awe-inspiring events that man has ever witnessed.

“The Great Eclipse,” the first of its kind of this magnitude in 99 years, crossed over the United States, moving from west to east over the course of the day. Hundreds of thousands of spectators made a pilgrimage to be in the path of 100 percent totality.

In southwest Ohio, totality meant 89-90 percent coverage.

The Piqua Daily Call local coverage took place from the John Johnston Farm & Indian Agency grounds, north of Piqua, off Hardin Road.

Photography was done using a pair of cameras, one for photographing the eclipse and the other to record changes in light as the moon blocked most of the sun’s light.

Cloud cover all but obscured the early moments of the eclipse, which began just after 1 p.m., but they began to thin out and dissipate about 30 minutes into the event.

Relatively clear skies made for far better photography conditions as the amazing celestial event took place before our eyes.

As the eclipse progressed over Piqua, a light breeze became noticeably cooler as the daylight began to fade. At its peak, daylight appeared to darken to an almost eerie, soft appearance that is difficult to describe but was amazing to experience.

Once the pinnacle of the eclipse passed, cloud cover again began to filter over the sun.

Monday’s eclipse was a truly once-in-a-lifetime experience, until the next total eclipse that will pass over, with Ohio being in the 100 percent totality zone. That event will occur in seven years.

Mike Ullery | Daily Call A three-photo composite image of Monday’s solar eclipse as seen from the John Johnston Farm & Indian Agency north of Piqua. The center image is the peak in our area where the moon covered 89 percent of the sun. The eclipse began at 1:02 p.m. with totality being reached at 2:27 p.m.
http://www.tdn-net.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/21/2017/08/web1_082117mju_solareclipse1-2.jpgMike Ullery | Daily Call A three-photo composite image of Monday’s solar eclipse as seen from the John Johnston Farm & Indian Agency north of Piqua. The center image is the peak in our area where the moon covered 89 percent of the sun. The eclipse began at 1:02 p.m. with totality being reached at 2:27 p.m.

Mike Ullery | Daily Call A single image showing the moon passing between the earth and sun, minutes before the eclipse reached its peak in southwest Ohio on Monday.
http://www.tdn-net.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/21/2017/08/web1_082117mju_solareclipse2-2.jpgMike Ullery | Daily Call A single image showing the moon passing between the earth and sun, minutes before the eclipse reached its peak in southwest Ohio on Monday.

By Mike Ullery

mullery@dailycall.com