Dunkin’ Donuts to stop using foam cups

NEW YORK (AP) — Foam cups at Dunkin’ Donuts will soon be history, removing what the company estimates will be a billion of them each year from the waste stream.

Dunkin’ said Wednesday that the polystyrene foam cups will be completely phased out from its stores globally by 2020.

Because foam packaging decomposes slowly, ends up in oceans and can harm marine life and other animals that ingest it, there has been push to ban its use.

Dunkin’ Brands Group, Inc., based in Canton, Massachusetts, joins other chain restaurants trying to diminish its footprint.

McDonald’s said last month that it would use only recycled or other environmentally friendly materials for its soda cups, Happy Meal boxes and other packaging by 2025.

Casino mogul Steve Wynn resigns

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Facing investigations by gambling regulators and allegations of sexual misconduct, billionaire casino mogul Steve Wynn has stepped down as chairman and CEO of the resorts bearing his names.

The Las Vegas-based Wynn Resorts in a statement said Wynn’s resignation Tuesday was effective immediately. It came less than two weeks after the Wall Street Journal reported that a number of women said Wynn harassed or assaulted them and that one case led to a $7.5 million settlement.

“In the last couple of weeks, I have found myself the focus of an avalanche of negative publicity,” Wynn said in a written statement. “As I have reflected upon the environment this has created — one in which a rush to judgment takes precedence over everything else, including the facts — I have reached the conclusion I cannot continue to be effective in my current roles.”

Wynn has vehemently denied the report’s allegations, which he attributes to a campaign led by his ex-wife. An attorney for Elaine Wynn has denied that she instigated the news report.

Wynn now faces investigations by gambling regulators in Nevada and Massachusetts, where the company is building a roughly $2.4 billion casino just outside Boston. The company earlier said a committee of independent directors would investigate the allegations that surfaced Jan. 26.

Etsy.com stops letting artists sell ivory work

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — A policy intended to deter the illegal trade of ivory and items made with the parts of endangered or threatened animals led the online sales website Etsy to remove such artwork sold by Alaska Native artists, who can legally use ivory in their pieces.

U.S. Sen. Dan Sullivan asked the chief executive officer of Etsy.com to reconsider its policy to allow Alaska Natives to keep selling products made from materials such as walrus tusks or from petrified wooly mammoth remains found in the nation’s most remote state.

Sullivan said he assumes the basis of the policy is to combat elephant poaching in Africa and India and that he supports such efforts.

“However, your policy fails to recognize that Alaska Natives are explicitly authorized under federal laws, the Marine Mammal Protection Act, to work with and sell walrus ivory, whale tooth and bone, and other non-elephant ivory,” the Alaska Republican wrote in a letter sent Friday to the Brooklyn, New York-based company.

Etsy has not responded to the letter, according to Sullivan spokesman Matt Shuckerow.

In an email to The Associated Press, Etsy said it can no longer allow Alaska Natives to sell animal products such as ivory but that their accounts remain active.

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