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2014 Miami County Fair Flower Show Schedule and Rules


Presented by The Miami County Council of Garden Clubs


FIRST SHOW: Saturday, August 9


Horticulture Schedule - - First Show


Division A: Horticulture Exhibits, Adult – (In place by 10:15)


Section I. Roses:


Hybrid Tea: named, one bloom, disbudded.


Class 1: White or near white


1st. Richard Smith, Troy BEST OF SHOW


2nd. Richard Smith, Troy


3rd. Richard Smith, Troy


Class 2: Yellow or yellow blend


1st. Richard Smith, Troy


2nd. Sheryl Sanders, Piqua


Class 3: Pink or pink blend


1. Richard Smith, Troy


2. Richard Smith, Troy


3. Richard Smith, Troy


Class 4: Red or red blend


1. Richard Smith, Troy


2 Richard Smith, Troy


Class 5: Orange or orange blend


Richard Smith, Troy


Class 8: Grandiflora: any named variety, may be naturally grown or disbudded.


1. Richard Smith, Troy


2. Richard Smith, Troy


Class 10: Polyanthus (Knockout Roses): any variety


1. Lisa Pierce, Troy


2. Sandy Fisher, Troy


Miniature: any named variety


Class 12: One spray, naturally grown with foliage attached


1. Sheryl Sanders, Piqua


Class 13: One bloom floating in water, named (containers provided)


1. Linda Mead, Pleasant Hill


Section II. Annuals – maximum height 36 inches


Zinnia: named, disbudded, with foliage attached


Class 17: Giant-flowered, dahlia type: one bloom, any color, any variety


1. Mary Nickel, Covington


3. Barrie Van Kirk, Troy


Class 18: Medium-flowered, 3”-4”, one bloom, any color, any variety


1. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


2. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


3. Esther Beckstedt, Troy


Class 19: Small-flowered, less than 3”, three blooms, any color, any variety


1. Linda Mead, Pleasant Hill


2. Hariette Walters, Tipp City


3. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


Marigold: named


Class 20: Carnation: large flowered, any color, any variety, disbudded


1. Barrie Van Kirk, Troy


2. Esther Beckstedt, Troy


Class 21: Chrysanthemum: large flowered, any color, any variety, disbudded


1. Barrie Van Kirk, Troy


Class 22: Small to mid-sized spray form, not disbudded


1. Barrie Van Kirk, Troy


Class 23. Coleus – one stem, named variety, no blossoms, no buds,


1. Patricia South, Piqua


2. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


3. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


Sunflower (Helianthus): named, one stem, with foliage attached


Class 24: Yellow


1. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


2. Linda Mead, Pleasant Hill


3. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


Class 25: Gold


1. Anita Brown, Troy


3. Linda Mead, Pleasant Hill


Class 26: Bicolor


1. Becky Blauser, Tipp City


2. Becky Blauser, Tipp City


Section III. Perennials


Gladiolus: Named, one spike, side shoots removed, foliage attached


Class 29: Pink, red, lavender, purple


1. Linda Mead, Pleasant Hill


2. Linda Mead, Pleasant


Class 30: Any other color


1. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


2. Linda Mead, Pleasant Hill


Class 32: Lycoris: Named, Examples: Magic Lily, Spider Lily


1. Anita Brown, Troy


2. Marian Moeckel, Troy


3. Toni Francis, Piqua


Lilies: Named, any variety


Class 32: Daylily


1. Joyce Randall, Piqua


2. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


3. Lisa Pierce, Troy


Class 33: Other (Asiatic, Trumpet, Oriental. Etc.), any variety


1. Linda Mead, Pleasant Hill


Hibiscus: Named and with foliage


Class 35: Single bloom with foliage


1. Joyce Randall, Piqua


2. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


3. Toni Francis, Piqua


Class 36. Rudbeckia: named, disbudded. Examples: Gloriosa Daisy, Black-eyed Susan


1. Sheryl Sanders, Piqua


2. Toni Francis, Piqua


3. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant HIll


Hydrangea, named


Class 37: Round form


1. Patricia South, Piqua BEST OF SHOW


2. Patricia South, Piqua


3. Toni Francis, Piqua


Class 39. Echinacea, named any variety


1. Anita Brown, Troy


2. Patricia South, Piqua


3. Sheryl Sanders, PIqua


Dahlia: named, one bloom, disbudded with foliage attached


Class 41: Size A, 8”-10” in diameter


1. Nicholas Thomas, Covington


Class 42: Size B, 6”-8” in diameter


1. Nicholas Thomas, Covington


Class 44: Size M, up to 4”


1. Cris Snider, Fletcher


Class 45: Ball Dahlias


1. Nicholas Thomas, Covington


Class 46: Flowering Shrub, named, one stem


1. Mary Nickel, Covington


Section IV. Specimen exhibits not in other Sections, named


Class 47: Round form


1. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill 1. Toni Francis, Piqua


2. Anita Brown, Troy 2. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


3. Sandy Fisher, Troy 3. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant HIll


Class 48: Spike form


1. Toni Francis, Piqua 1. Anita Brown, Troy


2. Linda Mead, Pleasant Hill 2. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


3. Toni Francis, Piqua 3. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


Class 49: Spray form


1. Sheryl Sanders 1. Esther Beckstedt, Troy


2. Patricia South, Piqua 2. Sandy Fisher, Troy


3. Esther Beckstedt, Troy 3. Anita Brown, Troy


Annual Herbs, fresh, named, any variety, one stem.


Class 50: Basil


1. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


2. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


3. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


Class 51: Dill


1. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


2. Mary Nickel, Covington


Class 52: Parley


1. Anita Brown, Troy


Class 54: Other


1. Anita Brown, Troy


2. Anita Brown, Troy


Perennial Herbs, fresh, named, one stem


Class 55: Lavender


1. Esther Beckstedt, Troy


Class 56: Mint


1. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


2. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


3. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


Class 57: Oregano


1. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


2. Anita Brown, Troy


Class 58: Sage


1. Linda Mead, Pleasant Hill


2. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


3. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


59. Thyme


1. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


2. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


Class 60: Other


1. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill 1. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


2. Toni Francis, Piqua 2. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


3. Mary Nickel, Covington 3. Mary Nickel, Covingon


Hosta: Single leaf, named


Class 61: Small: less than 6 square inches to 30 square inches


1. Anita Brown, Troy


2. Anita Brown, Troy


3. Cris Snider, Fletcher


Class 62: Medium: 30 – 64 square inches


1. Anita Brown, Troy


2. Barrie Van Kirk, Troy


3. Anita Brown, Troy


Class 63: Large-Giant: 64 square inches or larger


1. Linda Mead, Pleasant Hill


2. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


3. Mary Nickel, Covington


Grasses Named


Class 64:. Small (3 stems, Example: Carex, Helictotrichon, Imperata)


1. Toni Francis, Piqua


Class 65: Medium (3 stems, Example: Chasmanthium, Panicum, Pennisetum)


1. Barrie Van Kirk, Troy


2. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


Class 66: Large (1 stem Example: Erianthus, Miscanthus, Ornamental Corn)


1. Anita Brown, Troy


Class: 68. Other Foliage, Named, Examples: Elephant Ear, Caladium


1. Becky Blauser, Tipp City


2. Cris Snider, Fletcher


Section V. Special Class


Class 69. Houseplants (foliage), Named


1. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


2. Linda Mead, Pleasant Hill


3. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


Class 70. Hanging Basket (nonflowering), Plants Named


1. Linda Mead, Pleasant Hill


2. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


3. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


Class 71. Container Flower Garden (unusual container), Plants Named


1. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


2. Linda Mead, Pleasant Hill


3. Rhonda Burgess, Pleasant Hill


Section VI. Educational Exhibit. (Remains for both shows; refreshing flowers as needed).


Blooming Betsies


Section VII. Garden Club Entry


Class 72. Civic Beautification. Exhibition flower from club project, any named variety. State the name of club on exhibitor line of nametag.


1. Green Leaf Garden Club, Piqua


Section VIII. Invitational Exhibit.


Andy’s Garden Center of Piqua and Troy


Division C: Artistic Exhibits – Adult


First Show: August 9, Saturday (In place by 10:15)


Section IX. Individual Artistic Exhibits


Class 73: Busted Pipe (Showing Water)


1. Marian Moekel, Troy


2. Sandy Fisher, Troy


3. Diane Hart, Piqua


Class 74: Bad Hair Day (Dried Arrangement))


1. Hariette Walters, Tipp City


2. Marian Moeckel, Troy


3. Sandy Fisher, Troy


Mismatched Shoe (Two-Container)


Class 75: Traditional


1. Marian Moeckel, Troy 1. Sandy Fisher, Troy BEST OF SHOW


Class 77: Broken Mirror (Reflective)


1. Gloria Parker, Troy BEST OF SHOW


2. Sandy Fisher, Troy


3. Marian Moeckel, Troy


Splattered Paint (Mass Arrangement)


Class 79. Advanced


1. Marian Moeckel, Troy


Class 80. Missing Keys (Miniature – no greater than 5 inches)


1. Sandy Fisher BEST OF SHOW


2. Patricia South, Piqua


3. Joyce Randall, Piqua


Division D: Horticulture Exhibits, Junior (In place by 10:15)


Section X. Annuals and Perennials


Class 82: Round Form: named, one bloom, disbudded


1. Hayley Ely, age 12 1. Matt Carder, age 17


2. Taylor Ely, age 13 2. Matt Carder, age 17


3. Hayley Ely, age 12 3. Taylor Ely, age 13


Class 84: Spray Form: named


Taylor Ely, age 13


Division E: Artistic Exhibits, Junior


Section XI. Individual Artistic Exhibits -


Sunburn


Class 87: Ages 13-17


1. Taylor Ely, age 13


Black eye


Class 89: Ages 13-17


1. Taylor Ely, age 13 BEST OF SHOW


Second Show: August 12, Tuesday (In place by 10:15)


Section V. Special Class


Class 90: Houseplants (foliage), named


Class 91: Hanging basket (flowering), Plants named


Section VI. Educational Exhibit. Remains for both shows


Section VII. Garden Club Entry


Class 92: Civic Beautification. Exhibition flower from club project, any named variety. State the name of club on exhibitor line of nametag. (Flowers refreshed as needed.)


Section VIII. Invitational Exhibit. Andy’s Garden Center of Piqua and Troy. Remains for both shows


Horticulture Schedule – Same as the First Show


Division E. Artistic Exhibits – Adult


Section IX. Individual Artistic Exhibits


Class 93: Oversleeping (Still Life)


Class 94: Parking Ticket (Panel)


Class 95: Going In Circles (Novice)


Class 96: Going In Circles (Advanced)


Class 97: Missing Rung (Vertical)


Class 98: Poison Ivy (Predominately Green)


Class 99: Ants at the Picnic – (Miniature – 3 inches or Less)


Division F: Artistic Exhibits, Juniors


Section XI. Individual Artistic Exhibits - State age on top of entry tags.


Broken Crayons


Class 100: 12 years of age and younger


Class 101: Ages 13-17


Bike Wreck


Class 102: 12 years of age and younger


Class 103: Ages 13-17


AWARDS


Horticultural


Queen of Show: Best rose of the Adult Show


Miniature Queen of Show: Best miniature rose of the Adult Show


Princess of Show: Best horticulture specimen of the Adult Show


Green Thumb Award (may be given)


Best horticulture specimen of the Junior Show


Blue Ribbon—First


Red Ribbon—Second


White Ribbon—Third


Artistic


Best of Show—Traditional


Best of Show—Modern


Best of Show—Miniature


Award of Distinction (may be given)


Best Junior Traditional


Best Junior Modern


Form Guide for Cut Specimens


ROUND FORM: Single stem with circular center surrounded by one or more rows of ray flowers (petals).


In some doubles the center may not show. Examples: Anemones, Arcotis, Asters, Bellis, Calendula, Carnation, Celosia (crested, disbudded), Centaurea, Coneflower, Cosmos, Coreopsis, Chrysanthemum, Echinacea, Erigeron, Gallardia, Gerbera daisy, Gloriosa, Hibiscus, Ligularia (Desdamonia cultivar), Marigolds, Painted daisy, Pelergonium (geranium), Poppies, Shasta daisy, Sunflowers, Tithonia, Zinnias


SPRAY FORM: Single main stem with blooms or florets on pedicels or lateral branches, led by a terminal


flower that opens first. Examples: Achillea, Ageratum, Alstroemeria, Ammi, Amsonia, Anaphalis, Armeria, Asclepias, Aster (hardy), Astilbe, Begonia (hardy), Bergenia, Boltonia, Campanula glomerata, Cassia, Celosia (plumed) Chiastophyllum, Columbine, Chrysanthemum sprays, Eryngium, Eupatorium, Euphorbias, Geranium (perennial), Gamphrene, Gypsophilia paniculata, Heliotrope, Lisianthus, Marigolds (petite and French), Nasturtium, Phlox 9perennial), Petunias, Queen Anne’s Lace, Sedum, Statice, Sweet peas, Small sunflower sprays, Trucytris (toad lily) Yarrow,


SPIKE FORM: Single stalks in which the bottom florets usually bloom first, exception, Liatris. Examples: Acanthus, Agastache, Amaranthus, Aruncus, Baptisia, Bells of Ireland, Buddleia, Campanula, Campanula persicifolia, Cannas, Caryopteria, Chelone, Cleome, Delphinium, Disco Bell Hibiscus, Foxglove, Gadiolus, Hollyhocks, Hosta flowers, Larkspur, Liatrus, Ligularia, Linarea, Lupine, Lysimachia, Malva, Monarda, Nicotiana, Penstemon, Physastegia, Salvia (annual and perennial), Snapdragons, Stock, Tritoma, Verbascam, Veronic


Glossary


Pictures and descriptions can be found on the OAGC website: www.OAGC.org and in the OAGC Exhibitors’ and Judges’ Handbook. If you have questions please contact one of the show chairs.


Accessory: Anything used in an arrangement that is not plant material, the container, or the mechanics. For good proportion and scale, the accessory must be integrated in design and be 40% of the design height.


Armature: This design is a three-dimensional creative design, featuring a skeleton network of horizontal and/or vertical parallel lines, bars, etc. to form a gird. The armature is the grid on which the design is created and may be composed of one type of man-made or plant material (e.g. bamboo canes, chicken wire, framework of flower stems or twigs, etc.) The armature is used as a foundation and must remain dominant after other components are added. The armature can be self-supporting or put into a container.


Creative Vertical: A creative vertical is a creative line or line-mass design in which the dominant thrust is vertical. There may be more than one point of emergence and more than one focal area if it does not destroy the vertical thrust.


Diagonal: This design includes, either creative or traditional, a line that moves from one corner to the other. It can go from upper left to lower right or lower left to upper right. The eye should move from one “corner” to the other. The emphasis is on the line that the eye follows. The line is created using flowers, foliage, and line material.


Reversed Diagonal Design: This creative design has a strong diagonal line of material that reverses upon itself at the top and comes back toward the beginning. However, it remains open at the bottom, does not end in the container, and is long enough to show parallelism. The diagonal line is placed in a position that shows force and is used as a visual counterbalance, because alone it will lack visual balance. Additional plant material at the focal point should not be static, but have motion in the opposite direction to complete the balance. The diagonal line is of the same material for its entirety. It does not have to be one piece, but may be of attached pieces. It may be of plant material or man-made material (strong vines, wired rope, curved branches, etc…) Other plant material should not interrupt the form of the diagonal. The force of the diagonal line is stronger than the space formed within. The color of the diagonal and the container should be similar to avoid sharp contrast and imbalance.


The ending diagonal line may be longer than the beginning point, or even touch the table, but may not end in the container. The enclosed space is at the top. The design resembles three-fourths of an elongated oval.


Diagonal - Spatial Trust Design: “A Spatial Thrust design is a creative design with a dominate volume of empty space defined by two strong, straight, parallel placements of identical plant or man-made materials. The thrust may be vertical, diagonal or horizontal. The space is equal distant from start to the end between the parallel lines. One parallel line may be slightly longer than the other. Different lengths avoid monotony and balance problems. This is not a Parallel Design! The design may be in one or more containers. Plant material is added on right or left or both sides or base of the spatial thrust to embellish the space, but not in between the parallel lines. It is not necessary for the plant material to be identical on both sides. Space is the thrust and is what creates the design. Open area created by parallel placement of lines is void of any type of material.


Dried Design: This design may be traditional or creative. The design should be free of dust, tears, mildew and blemishes. Dried materials are plant materials that were living at one time and now dried by various methods. Dried material may not be artificially colored in traditional designs. Examples: glycerinated and skeletonized material, weathered wood, driftwood, and dried branches.


Illuminary: An illuminary design is a creative design incorporating light(s) as one of the components. The lighting must be an integral part of the design, not something added for the sole purpose of including lights. Mechanics of special lighting, such as wires, batteries, etc… must be concealed or be an integral part of the design. Emphasis is placed on color, pattern and balance. Design may or may not be abstract.


Line-Mass: An arrangement in which line and mass are important to the design. This is the design we see most frequently in American traditional design.


Mass Arrangement: Arrangements in which a large mass of flowers is emphasized rather than the individual flower heads. It always has a fullness and minimum voids. Mass arrangements may be traditional or modern.


Miniature Designs: Miniature designs are small scale designs in which the schedule states the size. A miniature design is not to exceed 5 or 3 inches in any one direction (check the schedule for size).


Emphasis is on simplicity of numbers, kinds of materials and use of color. A bloom should be no larger than 1/3 the size of the container or 1/3 the size of the design.


Miniature and Small Arrangements: Proportion and scale are the most important principles of design to be considered. No single flower should be larger than one-third of the size of the container. The height of the container should be one-third the height of the arrangement.


Modern: A departure from traditional and historic period pieces. Modern designs include abstract and free style using bold lines and forms.


Multi-Rhythmic Design: The design is primarily concerned with the design element of LINE. The rhythmic movement in the design might be straight, angled, rectangular, zigzagged, curved, circular, oval, spiral, arching, u-shaped, etc. Each is a separate rhythmic movement. Rhythmic movement may be either continuous, interrupted, or a combination of both. Each rhythm is not necessarily limited to one material. One material, such as ting-ting, may have two rhythmic patterns. Avoid confusing lines and unnecessary filler or transitional materials. Clarity of each rhythm is of vital importance.


Oriental Manner: These designs do not follow the strict patterns of traditional oriental arrangements, but still possess a clearly defined asymmetrical triangle and restrained simplicity. The linear design is very important and the design must be three-dimensional with height, width, and depth, following the tri-dimensional placement of Heaven, Man and Earth lines.


Panel Design: A 3-D Creative Design, self-supporting or suspended, in which a panel/s, plant and other (optional) components are used. If self-supporting, the overall design is placed independent of the background. It is not a Creative Plaque or Panel Assemblage. A base, container/s or other devices may provide support for the panel, but are rarely considered to be the panel. Panel Component/s are structural and an integral part of the design. They may be of any material, shape or form, natural or man-made, solid or transparent, or any combination. Structurally, the panel must have a dominance of surface quality, not merely enclosed space. The shape or form of the panel is primarily flat and two0-dimensional (a shape), yet the designer has freedom to cut, bend, weave, depress, etc.


Reflective Design: This creative design contains some components to involve the viewer through the use of reflection. It is not a design placed in front of a mirror. Brilliant light is important on this design. As not much plant material is reflective, the reflection must come from the container or incorporated materials. Shiny containers made of metal, mylar, mirrors, brass, silver or gleaming b lack can be used; or convex or concave items, mylar pieces and small mirrors placed into the design. The creative part is the reflective, not the reverse. There must be reflected images transmitted back to the viewer. One or more of the components must reflect light, motion or image and involve the viewer in some manner.


Rhythm: The feeling of motion enabling the eye to travel easily through all the details of the design. Rhythm can be achieved by curving lines, graduation of size and color values, or repetition of line, form, and color.


Satellitic Design is a creative design with a smaller design of the same color, form and /or texture placed near its base, having a curving connective line that becomes a vital part of its rhythmic pattern. The main, or large design, should be placed in a tall, creative container with the dominance of plant materials rising from the top of the container. The connecting line of plant or man-made material MUST be placed IN OR NEAR the container’s top, extending down in a CURVING line to a smaller container or object placed near the base of the main design


Showing Motion: A design showing motion uses curves of line material, placement of flowers and/or foliage to provide a feeling of movement. The design can be traditional or creative depending upon the design elements and principles used in the formation of the design. Circles sometime imply motion especially if they are not static. Diagonal lines can appear as movement in some cases. Actual movement within the design can also show motion, as a mobile.


Showing Water: A design that shows water can be traditional or creative. The water can be open, as in an Oriental design, or within a container, as in an underwater design. It is not a design where a clear container is used and the water line is visible from the side such as a stemmed rose in a clear bud vase.


Spiral Design: a creative design with a spiral coming down and around a strong vertical axis and may or may not be anchored into a container, with plant material added within the confines of the spiral to enhance it. The container should be vertical to establish the line. The spiraling portion may be of plant or man-made material. The spiral penetrates space. The flowers or other plant material should be kept low and must be inside the spiral, and not overpowering it. DO NOT add more plant material onto the spiral other than the original. The designer could anchor the spiral into the container or leave it out to penetrate space


Still Life: This design is a grouping of plant materials and other components by which a story is told or a theme interpreted, more by the objects used than by the choice of plant materials. The objects are chosen for their color, form, texture, size and their helpfulness in the design or in conveying a mood, feeling or message of the theme. Miniature figures as such are not found in a Still Life. The objects are actual size and true to their function. The emphasis in a Still Life is on objects; the plant material is often subordinate. The objects should be placed according to the principles of design, including depth and a correct disposition of space. Each object reacts upon and influences all the others. Fruit, flowers, and foliage are not restricted to the container as in the traditional flower arrangement but may be laid out in related groupings of varying heights and color value. A completed floral design is never found in a Still Life. A design with one or more accessories is not a Still Life. A Still Life can be staged in a niche or on a portion of a table and is realistic in feeling.


A Still Life must not be confused with an assemblage in a niche.


Characteristics of a Still Life; 1. Utilitarian objects do NOT lose their identity. They are still recognizable.


2. More objects than plant material.


3. NOT ABSTRACT!


4. Never a completed floral design.


5. Has a focal point.


6. Items are related through feelings or emotions


7. The objects are seldom merge into single unit. They are integrated as groups and retain their individuality.


Synergistic Design is a creative design. A grouping of plant materials, containers and/or other components sharing common characteristics designed to create an artistic whole.”


Synergistic Design: There are two types of synergistic designs 1. those in single containers. 2. containers connected by line material.


Each component adds to the development of a unified unit. Each individual unit is unified by color, form, repetition, or through plant material. Three or more containers are required and the space or number of containers is controlled by the space allotted. A connective line MAY be used between the containers or the development of each unit may unify the group with a pleasing rhythmic flow. As the design is creative, the staging may vary. The design may be staged flat on a table, may be attached to the background, arranged vertically; some of the containers may be elevated, etc. When finished, the individual units contribute to a unified whole (like pieces of a puzzle, each component contribute to the finished project.) Each must be a creative design, not traditional designs in a group. Each unit does not have to be a complete design, but may be. Line material may be used as a connective running from one container to another, creating a solid, defined pattern of line.


Type 1. Single Containers - Individual creative designs are arranged in separate containers, (limit the kinds and colors of materials to no more than three.) Basically one type of line material, one type of flower and one type of foliage is suggested. Then the partial or completed designs are placed close together, farther apart, etc., until a pleasing design is completed. Each individual design unit should be different; one might be vertical, one horizontal, and one contrasting in direction, etc., so when placed together each adds to the unified and completed whole. Type 2. Containers connected - Place all the containers in the area to be used for the design. Use line material as a connective, running from one container to another, creating a solid defined pattern of line. Then add flowers and foliage to each container as needed to complete the design. Characteristics of a Synergistic Design 1. 3 or more containers. 2. Grouped because of a common ‘oneness’ through repetition. 3. Each individual unit must be creative, not traditional and each should be different


4. Containers may be on one plane (flat on the table) or some on bases (in character to container) or vertically in a frame or on a post, etc. Containers may be staged separately or connected by line material. Usually three types of material (for restraint) one type line material one type flower one type foliage There must be unity and connectives used in the total effect, containers and flowers should blend in color and texture. The right colored background will help. Anything can be used for the containers or the selected plant materials. REMEMBER, this is a creative design.


Two-Container Design: A two container design may be traditional or creative. A traditional two container design would follow the traditional rules of placement. The containers would be similar and linked by the choice of flower, foliage and line materials used. In the traditional two container design the individual designs require the other to be complete.


Creative two container designs might include satellitic or stretch designs.


.


Stretch Design is a creative design using two similar containers where one is smaller and appears to have been pulled away from the other by tension using a connective line of STRAIGHT line material.


Traditional: Classified as line, mass, and massed-line arrangement, with geometric pattern. Line mass can be vertical,


horizontal, crescent, Hogarth curve, or asymmetrical triangle.


Transparency Design is a creative incorporation of a material of “see through” quality placed into the design, in front of part or parts of the whole to give the illusion of depth and space beyond.” The planes and forms overlap, giving the illusion of depth and space beyond. The object of the incorporated material is to break the line of color in the design and force the viewer to look THROUGH the material to see beyond. The incorporated material may be one of three kinds 1. Plant material, such as - baby’s breath, split leaves, branches, skeletonized leaves, etc. 2. Animal material, such as - sea fan, coral, sponges, etc. 3. Man-made materials, such as, acrylic, glass, mesh, screen, open-weave fabric, grill work, etc. In addition lights from different angles may be added to the effect.


Characteristics of a Transparency Design: 1. Incorporation of a “see-through” material into the creative design. 2. Great 3 dimensional effect. 3. Illusion of depth and space beyond where viewer is looking. 4. “See-through” material breaks line of color.


Underwater Arrangement: An Underwater design is a creative design, with part or parts placed underwater to create interest. Water magnifies the materials, creating an element of interest and surprise, so scale must be given consideration when selecting plant materials.


Vertical: has an overall appearance of power and strength. The vertical style most often requires a focal point either near the top of the arrangement or the rim. In a true vertical design, the materials used will remain within the width of the container and very seldom will it extend beyond the sides. The finished product will be a tall floral arrangement. A vertical arrangement is one that carries the eye top to bottom like a column. It can be compact or wider, but the concept is that the eye travels up and down and not side to side.


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