Navigating the North Pole


Cookson third graders maps out Santa’s world in 3-D

By Melanie Yingst - myingst@civitasmedia.com



Mike Ullery | Civitas Media Lillie Wendel, Amyannah Tucker, and Trace Hall, all 9 year olds, give a tour of the class’ North Pole town.


TROY — According to Google Maps, the North Pole is right off Highway 2 along the Tanana River in Alaska.

Do you need Santa’s address? Just send your letter to Santa Claus House, 101 St. Nicholas Drive, North Pole AK 99705.

And if you’d like a more detailed map of the North Pole, just ask any Cookson Elementary third grader — they’ll tell you how to get there.

Despite the less than favorable meteorological conditions, Lane Lucas and Shelley Stewart’s third grade classrooms were transformed into a winter wonderland complete with snow and plenty of food for all of Santa Claus’ reindeer. Don’t know where to start your adventure at the North Pole? Just take a look at the 3-D map of North Pole Town.

Sadena Winter, 8, said she helped make the “Cake House” and the North Pole’s “Elf School” for the North Pole town, which filled the classroom and is about the size of a regulation size ping pong table.

Stewart shared how the 3-D map of the North Pole was an unique way to make learning about maps and grids more fun and for the third-grade students to celebrate the holiday and use their imaginations.

“We made alphanumeric maps of the North Pole, too,” Winter shared. “One of the places is called the reindeer playpen.”

Natalie King, 9, said she helped create the “Elves Restaurant” where Santa’s employees can go grab a hot meal after their gift shift.

“It’s very nice. It’s a shop that serves elf food because this is where all the elves and reindeer could go maybe to get something to eat,” King said. “They serve spaghetti and even reindeer food. Elves also eat cookies!”

Stewart and Lucas’ students didn’t forget to fuel up Santa Claus’ favorite mode of transportation. Students also made reindeer food at the end of the school day last week.

“When they see the sparkles in the moonlight, they know they need to stop at that house so we need to feed the reindeer,” Stewart shared with her students.

Students also had a hand in making scientific snowballs out of sodium polyacrylate (the material found in disposable diapers). When cold water is added to the absorbing material, it looks and feels like cold snow.

“It feels so cold and mushy,” said Lillie Wendel. “It’s like soft, but it doesn’t stick.”

And checking the city of Troy’s forecast for the next few days, it’s as close to snow as the students will get for quite sometime.

Mike Ullery | Civitas Media Lillie Wendel, Amyannah Tucker, and Trace Hall, all 9 year olds, give a tour of the class’ North Pole town.
http://www.tdn-net.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/21/2015/12/web1_121715mju_cookson_northpoletown.jpgMike Ullery | Civitas Media Lillie Wendel, Amyannah Tucker, and Trace Hall, all 9 year olds, give a tour of the class’ North Pole town.
Cookson third graders maps out Santa’s world in 3-D

By Melanie Yingst

myingst@civitasmedia.com

Reach Melanie Yingst at myingst@civitasmedia.com or follow her on Twitter @Troydailynews

Reach Melanie Yingst at myingst@civitasmedia.com or follow her on Twitter @Troydailynews