Lock 12 project unveiled


Recreation of the lock to be built on Elm Street

By Melanie Yingst - myingst@civitasmedia.com



History of Troy’s Lock 12 Timeline:

1836 (by June): Canal completed to Dye Mill Road.

1837 (by July): Canal completed to Piqua

July 4, 1837: Canal officially opened and dedicated

1850s onward: Canal use declines with the arrival of railroads

1909: Last paying canal boat comes through the city of Troy

1913: The great flood severely damages the canal.

1925-1926: Hobart Brothers building built over the old lock

2015: Canal blocks were removed from the lock site after the Hobart building was torn down

2016: Canal blocks placed at Treasure Island

Courtesy of City of Troy and Troy Historical Library

TROY — When the Hobart/ITW manufacturing building was demolished, it unearthed a piece of city history.

Lock 12, part of the Miami-Eric canal, was revealed once again after the former Hobart Brothers (now owned by ITW) manufacturing building was leveled to its current vacant lot on Main Street.

The Troy Historical Society and the city of Troy are planning to build a historic model out of the preserved canal blocks to commemorate the historic Lock 12’s place in city history. The project is expected to be completed by May 1 as part of the Hobart Brother’s company 100th anniversary.

The project will use the recovered lock blocks for the 120-foot long by 15-foot wide mock-up of the former lock which was buried underneath the factory. Three markers will be part of the project including a Hobart Brothers Company historical marker, a Lock 12 historical marker and an official Ohio Historical Society marker. The project also includes a 25-foot concrete pedestrian pad.

The project is expected to be privately funded. The city of Troy is currently reviewing contractors for the project. The cost of the project is projected to be under the city’s $50,000 threshold, bypassing the need for council approval.

The display of lock canal blocks will be located on city land located on Elm Street, next to the Eagles club parking lot adjacent to Treasure Island Park.

Troy city councilman and Troy Historical Society member Doug Tremblay said the project will preserve a piece of local history.

Tremblay estimates it will take up to 80 canal blocks to build the project with stones recovered from the demolition.

“Each one was hand-carved out of limestone,” Tremblay said. “Lock 12 was historic to Troy. Hobart Brothers (ITW) saw the significance of the (lock) stones. They did a wonderful job during the demolition. They saved more than 200 blocks with some of them used at Treasure Island.”

City of Troy project manager Stan Kegley presented the project to the board of park commissioners on Tuesday. The land is not dedicated park land, but will be maintained by the park department.

“When the Hobart Brothers Manufacturing building was removed, Lock 12 sat below the factory,” Kegley said. “The Hobart Brothers company did a wonderful job taking the lock stones out and preserving them.”

Kegley said the remaining canal block could be used to build up a wall roughly the same size of the original canal lock.

The park board of commissioners approved to move forward with the project.

Kegley said the project will be designed to be maintenance friendly and easy to mow around the Treasure Island location.

Recreation of the lock to be built on Elm Street

By Melanie Yingst

myingst@civitasmedia.com

History of Troy’s Lock 12 Timeline:

1836 (by June): Canal completed to Dye Mill Road.

1837 (by July): Canal completed to Piqua

July 4, 1837: Canal officially opened and dedicated

1850s onward: Canal use declines with the arrival of railroads

1909: Last paying canal boat comes through the city of Troy

1913: The great flood severely damages the canal.

1925-1926: Hobart Brothers building built over the old lock

2015: Canal blocks were removed from the lock site after the Hobart building was torn down

2016: Canal blocks placed at Treasure Island

Courtesy of City of Troy and Troy Historical Library

Follow Melanie Yingst on Twitter @Troydailynews

Follow Melanie Yingst on Twitter @Troydailynews