Council to consider Halifax Villas rezoning


Tom Kendall recuses himself due to conflict of interest

By Melanie Yingst - myingst@aimmediamidwest.com



Provided graphic A layout of the proposed Halifax Villas, a proposed retirement community on both sides of Piqua-Troy Road.

Provided graphic A layout of the proposed Halifax Villas, a proposed retirement community on both sides of Piqua-Troy Road.


TROY — The city of Troy’s City Council will have a third reading on Monday of the proposed 107-acre rezoning application for “Halifax Villas,” a proposed retirement community on both sides of Piqua-Troy Road.

On Aug. 15, the community and economic development committee met to discuss the ordinance.

Tom Kendall has recused himself from the discussion to avoid a conflict of interest. Kendall said he had discussed purchasing property from Frank Harlow, the owner and applicant of the property, if the planned development is approved by council.

“While no money has exchanged hands, we are looking at purchasing one of these properties. To avoid any potential view of conflict, I will recuse myself,” said Kendall at the committee meeting.

Committee members John Schweser and Bill Twiss OK’d the ordinance and will make a positive recommendation to council. Two residents spoke against the rezoning change.

The owner and applicant is Frank Harlow of Halifax Land Company. If approved, the development, called Halifax Villas, will be completed in two phases. According to the planning commission report, the homes will be marketed to the “empty nester” and include an assisted-living facility in its future plans. The first phase will be residential use with a 3,000-square-foot private clubhouse for resident use. The first phase includes 101 single-family lots on the west side of Piqua-Troy Road on 50.858 acres. The east side of Piqua-Troy Road will consist of 159 zero lot line town homes on 32.35 acres and a private clubhouse and private space on 11.3 acres. The proposed value of the single-family homes will be $275,000 to 350,000, and the town homes will be valued at $175,000 and up.

The development will include private streets, so the city would not provide curbs or sidewalks and the maintenance of the private streets will be the responsibility of the homeowner’s association.

The development will have city water and sewer services along with seven retention ponds and two detention ponds throughout the development. City trash service is not included. The property is within the city limits and in Miami East School District.

Schweser asked if there was any way to restrict the developer from selling off the property to other builders.

Harlow stated the planned development would have a home owner’s association and have restrictive rules on the appearance of the homes. Harlow said they will be brick and vinyl.

“We are targeting the retirement community, we want to make it maintenance free,” he said. Harlow said he intends to build the development himself, but if that should change, other builders would have to follow the restrictive rules of building design.

“Our targeted demographic is 50 and above,” he said.

Schweser asked if Harlow anticipated any children living in the retirement community.

“I don’t anticipate any children, but you don’t know. Somebody could move in and somebody could have their grandkids, I can’t stop that … I talked to the superintendent the other day, I don’t think this will have any impact on Miami East,” he said.

According to Harlow, his larger home and lot development Halifax Estates, has only eight children living within the 40 lots built out so far.

“We are not even impacting Miami East too negatively in the bigger subdivision,” Harlow said.

Rusty Miller, a resident on Eldean Road, said he spoke with Dr. Todd Rappold and said he had different numbers from the school district. Miller previously served on the board of education.

“I got different numbers from Dr. Rappold. He said there are 20 students in Halifax. He’s already looking in to putting trailers out there (on school property). We just put a new building out there a few years ago, so we are already at capacity and beyond.”

Miller said he’s also concerned with traffic in the area since North Market was condensed from four lanes to two. He noted many people take “the back way” to the west side of town off Eldean and Experiment Farm. Miller said the infrastructure and traffic in the county “is just not going to hold.”

Robert Brumbaugh, a resident of Staunton Twp., said he and his wife are opposed to the development.

“To dump 260 households on to the Miami East taxpayers is wrong, absolutely wrong,” Brumbaugh said. Brumbaugh said with no amenities, grocery stores and other services, he asked what was so attractive about the proposed development on the east side of Troy. Brumbaugh said “the cart is before the horse” in regards to the development. Brumbaugh also said he “almost believed Harlow” in regards to his plan to fix the water problems in Finsbury, but said he’d “wait and see, again.”

The rezoning application was approved by Planning Commission. At the public hearing, two residents, including Miller, expressed their concern with traffic and school overcrowding in the Miami East District where the land is located.

Director of Public Service and Safety Patrick Titterington said the property will have to follow subdivision and zoning codes and conform to storm water requirements.

In other news:

Troy City Council will also introduce four new Troy Fire Department firefighters and medics at the meeting. According to the agenda, the new members were appointed on Aug. 13. They are Brandon Cottrell, Sean Fellers, Jesse Hackney and Kendra Vanover.

A request to use the Public Square for the second annual Pink Ribbon Girls event on Oct. 19 was requested. The Public Square would close at Cherry, Franklin, Walnut and Water streets at noon on Oct. 19. Council approval is required for the sale and consumption of alcohol within the event area. The event includes a concert, family activities and a 5K run. During the committee meeting, Mayor Michael Beamish said he supported the mission of the Pink Ribbon Girls and hosting the event in Troy, but also stated his concerns with events include alcohol at the Aug. 17 meeting.

Council will have its first reading for new signage for the Troy-Hayner Cultural Center. A public hearing will be held Sept. 4 due to the signage exceeding the city’s sign code regulations. Signs will be located on West Main Street, the second sign on West Main Street and North Oxford, 25 N. Oxford St. and the fourth on West Water Street. The sign on 25 N. Oxford St. will be 7 feet and 4 inches tall and West Water Street’s sign will be 9 feet 4 inches tall.

Provided graphic A layout of the proposed Halifax Villas, a proposed retirement community on both sides of Piqua-Troy Road.
https://www.tdn-net.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/21/2018/08/web1_HalifaxVillas_ne2018818162532967-1.jpgProvided graphic A layout of the proposed Halifax Villas, a proposed retirement community on both sides of Piqua-Troy Road.
Tom Kendall recuses himself due to conflict of interest

By Melanie Yingst

myingst@aimmediamidwest.com