City purchases floating tents


SmithFly’s tents part of ‘floating campground’ project

By Melanie Yingst - myingst@aimmediamidwest.com



On Sept. 29-30, the University of Dayton River Stewards camped out on the Great Miami River in SmithFly Shoal Tents by Treasure Island Park. The city of Troy recently purchased 10 tents and four floating fire rings as part of its Great Miami River floating campground project.

On Sept. 29-30, the University of Dayton River Stewards camped out on the Great Miami River in SmithFly Shoal Tents by Treasure Island Park. The city of Troy recently purchased 10 tents and four floating fire rings as part of its Great Miami River floating campground project.


TROY — The city of Troy recently purchased 10 SmithFly “Shoal” floating tents and four floating fire rings as part of its “Great Miami River Campground Project.”

During the Oct. 1 city council meeting, Director of Public Service and Safety Patrick Titterington reported on the recent University of Dayton river stewards visit held Sept. 29-30. At the meeting, Titterington reported to council each tent cost the city $900 and each fire ring cost $500. The city also purchased anchors and rope for the tents for a total cost of $14,010. The Troy Foundation awarded the city $5,000 for the purchase of five tents, one fire ring and cable and anchors for the project on Sept. 25. The net amount the city invested in the project is $9,010.

More than 50 students attended the event. Participants canoed down the Great Miami River from Piqua to Treasure Island Park. Titterington said the city purchased 10 of the Troy-based company’s floating tents, which students anchored and slept in on the riverway during the event.

According to a public information request, Titterington applied for a grant on Aug. 13 from the Troy Foundation seeking $7,000 for the project. In the grant application, Titterington cites quality of life initiatives and bringing awareness of the river and its recreational amenity to the Troy community.

“This project will also serve as an opportunity for Troy to engage in destination marketing,” according to the grant. “Shoal tents are a unique concept, and we aim to draw people to Troy to experience a campground on water not found anywhere else.”

The application also states its future plans include city sponsorship or partnership with other organizations to “fund future programs that utilize the tents and floating fire rings.”

“We intend to host events and programs similar to the UD River Stewards, including during Riverfest and other festivals, concerts, etc.,” Titterington said. “The River Stewards were very complimentary of the event and have already asked to come back next year.”

Titterington said the city will research programs on how to implement the use of the tents, which may include a partnership with Adventures on the Great Miami or another private outfit.

“Our thanks to the Troy Foundation for contributing to this project, which will further enhance the activities on and attraction of our Great Miami River amenity,” said Mayor Mike Beamish. “It’s further proof that the investment the Troy City Council made in Treasure Island as a premiere river recreation destination was a sound decision.”

SmithFly will also contribute $3,596 to purchase four Shoal Tents to the project. Adventures on the Great Miami also participated in contributing $1,798 for two Shoal tents.

On Sept. 29-30, the University of Dayton River Stewards camped out on the Great Miami River in SmithFly Shoal Tents by Treasure Island Park. The city of Troy recently purchased 10 tents and four floating fire rings as part of its Great Miami River floating campground project.
https://www.tdn-net.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/21/2018/10/web1_Troytents_cmyk_ne2018103123531344.jpgOn Sept. 29-30, the University of Dayton River Stewards camped out on the Great Miami River in SmithFly Shoal Tents by Treasure Island Park. The city of Troy recently purchased 10 tents and four floating fire rings as part of its Great Miami River floating campground project.
SmithFly’s tents part of ‘floating campground’ project

By Melanie Yingst

myingst@aimmediamidwest.com