Shores clubhouse under new construction


Structural issues turn renovation into rebuild

By Melanie Yingst - myingst@aimmediamidwest.com



With the existing foundation in place, workers will start new construction on the Miami Shores Golf Course clubhouse. The building will be completely rebuilt instead of renovated due to structure issues. Pro shop foundation work has added $16,000 to the project’s $1.2 million bill, but not other costs are anticipated at this time, according to city officials.

With the existing foundation in place, workers will start new construction on the Miami Shores Golf Course clubhouse. The building will be completely rebuilt instead of renovated due to structure issues. Pro shop foundation work has added $16,000 to the project’s $1.2 million bill, but not other costs are anticipated at this time, according to city officials.


TROY — The Miami Shore Golf Course clubhouse renovation project has turned into a new construction project due to unforeseen structural issues.

Last week, the clubhouse structure was completely demolished and the structure will be rebuilt entirely, according to city officials. The foundation of the clubhouse remains intact. The initial plans called for the walls to remain and be reinforced with the roofline to be rebuilt.

Director of public service and safety Patrick Titterington said the city didn’t anticipate a total rebuild. He said as construction workers removed the roof, the existing exterior block walls “were not built with much, if any bracing, prior to the old trusses being placed.” Titterington explained the contractor had the choice to rebrace the walls, but recommended a rebuild due to the structure’s flaws.

Titterington said the structural issues could not have been foreseen and was only discovered after contractors removed the roof as part of the initial design to streamline the roofing.

Titterington said the only additional cost is the pro shop excavation for $16,000 due to the pro shop’s walls leaning and eroding foundation due to being located by the creek. No other additional costs related to the clubhouse is anticipated at this time, Titterington said. The project timeline is also not impacted by the new construction.

The report to city council stated the contractor will pour additional footings and build new exterior walls before placing new roof trusses, adding 140 square feet of storage room area.

“Any costs are well within the contingency and are also within the council authorization,” the report states.

The project is being overseen by Vancon General Contractor of Dayton, who submitted the lowest bid for the project at $1,217,360 on June 22. The bid also included an alternate to repair the course’s parking lot, but does not expand it. Council authorized the project not to exceed $1.71 million last April.

The clubhouse has stood on the grounds since 1948, with the pro shop added in 1954.

Work continues on the golf course’s self-service driving range, which sits along the front of the Miami Shores property. Dirt from Kettering Health Network’s Troy hospital site has been hauled in to grade the driving area. Seeding work on the range, overseen by the Mercer Group, Inc., began Aug. 1.

The range will span 300 yards in length, with five target greens and a small chipping green off to the side. The Mercer Group completed site work at the levee area for $49,970. A small building will be on-site with a ball dispenser. A new parking lot for the driving range was installed. The entire cost of the range is expected to cost under $200,000, according to city officials.

The course remains open as scheduled. The pro shop will be operating out of a temporary building in front of the clubhouse to continue serving golfers through the end of the season. The temporary building will then be used as storage space when renovations are completed.

Last year, council approved to pay ALT Architecture $80,000 for design work of the clubhouse renovation.

According to a public information request, Miami Shores 18-hole public golf course has received a $250,000 general fund transfer each year in the last three years.

The golf course had the following revenues: $648,613 in 2015; $628,787 in 2016; and $652,773 in 2017. Expenditures, such as salaries, equipment and supplies, at Miami Shores included: $866,755 in 2015, $822,103 in 2016; and $820,272 in 2017. The city noted capital expenditures have routinely been mowers, maintenance equipment and golf carts.

With the existing foundation in place, workers will start new construction on the Miami Shores Golf Course clubhouse. The building will be completely rebuilt instead of renovated due to structure issues. Pro shop foundation work has added $16,000 to the project’s $1.2 million bill, but not other costs are anticipated at this time, according to city officials.
https://www.tdn-net.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/21/2018/10/web1_miamishores_cmyk_ne20181014121556388.jpgWith the existing foundation in place, workers will start new construction on the Miami Shores Golf Course clubhouse. The building will be completely rebuilt instead of renovated due to structure issues. Pro shop foundation work has added $16,000 to the project’s $1.2 million bill, but not other costs are anticipated at this time, according to city officials.
Structural issues turn renovation into rebuild

By Melanie Yingst

myingst@aimmediamidwest.com