Council to review Riverside Drive project


Fees waived for all residnets, report states

By Melanie Yingst - myingst@aimmediamidwest.com



TROY — Troy City Council will review several items regarding the proposed Riverside Drive Phase II project on Monday.

The streets and sidewalks committee held a meeting on Nov. 12. Several residents voiced their opposition of the project’s plan to move the 8-foot wide recreational trail to the west side of the roadway and “forced” annexation to the city for sewer services.

The project also includes adding sewer and the city planned to waive tap-in fees and costs associated with the fees. At the request of council member Todd Severt, he asked the city to extend the deadline for residents to sign up for the waiver of fees until Nov. 16. The city plans to pay for their annexation costs as well. According to the report, all owners in the project area have signed up.

Legislation includes authorizing the Director of Public Service and Safety to bid the Riverside Drive Phase II project not to exceed $1.4 million; amend an agreement with LJB, Inc. to add $15,000 for total of $154,000 for the project design; and authorize action such as annexation and waive tap-in fees for residents in the area. The city has received a $700,000 grant from Ohio Public Works Commission for the cost of the project. If approved by council, the project is expected to begin around May 20,2019.

The scope of the project includes Riverside Drive north of the Troy Community Park entrance to just north of Orchard Drive. The project includes roadway construction, utilities, sidewalk, curb and gutter, and eight inch sanitary sewer line and the recreational trail relocation.

In other news:

Council will consider legislation to recommend entering into a professional agreement with Strand Associates Inc. to design West Main Street Corridor Improvements in two phases for $2,030,000. The design work will include Cherry Street to Interstate 75. The scope of the project is to widen the road, sidewalks, curbs, stormwater, traffic signal configuration, and a median in the area of Elm and Adams Street. Director of Public Service and Safety Patrick Titterington said the city has applied for several grants including $2.5 million of safety grants and $6 million in MVRPC state and federal grants. The fund balance may also be covered in a bond. Emergency legislation is not required. The total cost of the project is expected to be $12 million.

Fees waived for all residnets, report states

By Melanie Yingst

myingst@aimmediamidwest.com