Next phase Coleman-Allen-Saidleman building approved


Artist’s rendering An artist’s rendering of the exterior design concept, executed by Jess Neilsen with The Olivine Design Studio. Neilsen took the time to do extensive research with the help of Patrick Kennedy at the Troy Historical Society to map the building’s legacy.

Artist’s rendering An artist’s rendering of the exterior design concept, executed by Jess Neilsen with The Olivine Design Studio. Neilsen took the time to do extensive research with the help of Patrick Kennedy at the Troy Historical Society to map the building’s legacy.


TROY — Troy Community Works (TCW) has announced the approval of the next phase towards the historical renovation of the $2.5 million Coleman-Allen-Saidleman (CAS) building project at 1 W. Main St. on Troy’s Public Square. This project, which has been managed by the volunteer board of TCW along with other community champions, has taken the road to renovation that ensures the historical qualities of this building are restored accurately with respect for the building’s legacy.

Named the Coleman Building after Asa Coleman, a local investor, and designed and fashioned after the Morris House by H.A. Bellow. The Coleman-Allen-Saidleman, as it is known today, was built circa 1855 and was placed on the National Registry in 1975.

The phase brought to the city of Troy for approval at this time is the exterior design concept, executed by Jess Neilsen with The Olivine Design Studio. Neilsen took the time to do extensive research with the help of Patrick Kennedy at the Troy Historical Society to map the building’s legacy. One of the noted contributions to the community was during the Civil War. The third floor of the building became the headquarters and armory for the 71st Ohio Volunteer Infantry including military units: The Lafayette Blues, the Troy Rangers and the Troy Artillery. These units utilized the upper rooms for both social and military functions including recruiting, training and dances, while drilling and marching in parades on the Public Square.

Neilsen’s color choices were inspired by the uniforms worn by these soldiers during the war and after. The rendering shows the beauty of the uniform blue that is highlighted with gold features, inspired by the details on the jackets worn, specifically by the Lafayette Blues. Troy Community Works is thrilled to bring recognition and connection to the rich history of Troy and its contribution to building our country.

TCW is on the final phase of securing funding and that we are hopeful that construction will start this fall with completion in the Spring 2020. The building will feature retail spaces, as well as eight studio and loft style apartments accessible by elevator.

Established in 2007 as a grassroots effort to strengthen the downtown commercial and residential neighborhoods, Troy Community Works (TCW) is a private nonprofit organization dedicated to the long term growth and livability of Troy through sustainable building and community development. Their goal is to create collaborative partnerships with civic, private, and other community organizations to preserve and create a vibrant core for our city.

TCW successfully renovated the exterior and first floor commercial spaces at 221 E. Main St. — the “Eastgate building” through city, state and private supporters. This building is the location of Baby and Co. 3D/4D Ultrasound and Western Ohio Mortgage. The completion of the second floor of the Eastgate building will include a spacious two-bedroom apartment and two office spaces.

Troy Community Works may be best known for organizing their two signature events, The Day of Caring and Second Story Secrets. The Day of Caring invites community members and businesses to lend a hand to help Troy non-profits spruce up the city, benefiting places like the Troy Senior Center, Women’s Abuse Shelter, and Lincoln Community Center. In 2020, we plan to go into the community, identifying a neighborhood in need, and making a difference directly to the citizens.

The Second Story Secrets Tour features the hidden “secret” spaces of the upper floors and buildings in the downtown corridor. In 2017, 370 people enjoyed perusing the obscure basements and third floor ballrooms usually off limits to the public, while also featuring new renovation projects in progress. We will be featuring some “must see” locations this fall, November 2nd. Look for more details to come and be sure to get your tickets early on the TCW website.

The Troy Community Works Board is grateful to the community for their ongoing support to enhance the long-term well-being and livability of the City of Troy. Troy Community Works is a proud member of the Activate Troy Partnership, a community partnership formed to study and coordinate efforts to impact the quality of life for all Troy residence. Contact Troy Community Works through their website

For more information, visit www.troycommunityworks.org.

Artist’s rendering An artist’s rendering of the exterior design concept, executed by Jess Neilsen with The Olivine Design Studio. Neilsen took the time to do extensive research with the help of Patrick Kennedy at the Troy Historical Society to map the building’s legacy.
https://www.tdn-net.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/21/2019/06/web1_Coleman-Allen_Rendering_Blue_06.14.19.jpgArtist’s rendering An artist’s rendering of the exterior design concept, executed by Jess Neilsen with The Olivine Design Studio. Neilsen took the time to do extensive research with the help of Patrick Kennedy at the Troy Historical Society to map the building’s legacy.