Davidson addresses veterans


Congressman speaks on national growth, health care

Cody Willoughby | Troy Daily News Rep. Warren Davidson addresses attendees of the monthly veterans’ breakfast hosted by the Miami County Veteran’s Museum on Wednesday in Troy.

Cody Willoughby | Troy Daily News Rep. Warren Davidson addresses attendees of the monthly veterans’ breakfast hosted by the Miami County Veteran’s Museum on Wednesday in Troy.


Cody Willoughby | Troy Daily News Members of the Troy ‘67 Quilters present Rep. Warren Davidson with a customized patriotic quilt during the monthly veterans’ breakfast at the Miami County Veteran’s Museum on Wednesday in Troy.


By Cody Willoughby

cwilloughby@troydailynews.com

TROY — Congressman Warren Davidson, representative of Ohio’s 8th district, met with veterans of all ages during the monthly breakfast held at the Miami County Veteran’s Museum on Wednesday.

The event — held monthly — is free of charge to veterans of the United States armed services.

Davidson began by addressing the nation’s first year under the Trump adminstration, expressing that most of his feelings on the administration’s actions leaned optimistic.

“A lot of people have expressed their thoughts and concerns about the way the last year has gone,” said Davidson, “but I feel that this administration is moving us in the right direction in most ways. Through a number of recent years, our national growth averaged at about 1.5 percent. Prognosticators indicated that this was the new normal. Everything had expanded in such a way that 3 percent annually was a thing of the past. (The year) 2017 saw growth of 3.1 percent, which is a clear sign of positive action being taken.”

Davidson also discussed the current standing of the House of Representatives and the Senate, and voiced his own concerns with the job being done in the Senate chamber.

“For the first time since 2005, the House passed all of its appropriation bills on time,” said Davidson. “The federal budget goes from October 1 until September 30 every year. It’s been 12 years since the House passed all of their bills subject to amendment on time.

“Unfortunately, the Senate has not passed theirs, and what that leads to is something called a continuing resolution. A continuing resolution says, ‘Whatever you were doing, just keep doing it that way.’ That means the same funds level applies, but it also means that the same strings attached or lack of strings attached applies. Most of your Congress is being stripped of a voice because our amendments don’t take hold. No one wants to shut the government down, but I believe that continuing resolutions are ultimately not good. It’s bad for our country. For all their claims that they care so much, the Senate hasn’t gotten the work done. Maybe they crammed over Christmas break, and they’ll come back ready.”

Davidson went on to take questions from those in attendance.

When asked about legal hearings held in the last 15 months regarding the alleged actions of major candidates, Davidson said, “There’s a lot of people that are passionate right now, and I think it’s due to the idea that our country is not supposed to be one where your position or status matters. It’s supposed to be a nation of law. No one is above the law, even the Clinton family or the Trump family. I guarantee you that for most of America, if the FBI looks at your situation and wants evidence, they don’t ask you to turn over what you might think is relevant to the investigation and let you keep the rest.

“You’ve got a look at things that have come to light in the last year with the FBI, and it does beg the question — what is going on with our FBI and our justice department? That’s not to change the subject, but I think for our country moving forward, these things can not be about the person or their position or their party. No one’s above the law, and right now I don’t think there’s a lot of confidence on either side ideologically. That’s unfortunate.”

Davidson was also inquired about potential cuts in Medicare and Medicaid and rising costs in medicine.

“There were some reforms to Medicaid that passed last year. If you’re above the poverty line up to 138 percent, you qualify for full Medicaid. Of the Medicaid expansion population, 24 percent of able-bodied adults in the program work full-time. That means three-fourths don’t. We’ll see a push this year to get back work requirements needed to qualify. As for Medicare, the only major change was for people who earned more than $40,000 a month — not a year, a month — to pay a premium of $145 annually. I guess that is technically an increase in Medicare costs, but the louder narrative indicates that we’re stealing from everyone in Medicare.”

Following the question and answer session, the Troy ‘67 Quilters presented Rep. Davidson with a customized quilt as a token of appreciation for his service.

Davidson will be back in Washington next week, when Congress reconvenes on Monday, Jan. 8.

For more information on Rep. Warren Davidson, visit www.davidson.house.gov.

For more information on the monthly veteran’s breakfast, visit www.miamivalleyveteransmuseum.com.

Cody Willoughby | Troy Daily News Rep. Warren Davidson addresses attendees of the monthly veterans’ breakfast hosted by the Miami County Veteran’s Museum on Wednesday in Troy.
https://www.tdn-net.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/21/2018/01/web1_DavidsonVets1-Copy.jpgCody Willoughby | Troy Daily News Rep. Warren Davidson addresses attendees of the monthly veterans’ breakfast hosted by the Miami County Veteran’s Museum on Wednesday in Troy.

Cody Willoughby | Troy Daily News Members of the Troy ‘67 Quilters present Rep. Warren Davidson with a customized patriotic quilt during the monthly veterans’ breakfast at the Miami County Veteran’s Museum on Wednesday in Troy.
https://www.tdn-net.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/21/2018/01/web1_DavidsonVets2-Copy.jpgCody Willoughby | Troy Daily News Members of the Troy ‘67 Quilters present Rep. Warren Davidson with a customized patriotic quilt during the monthly veterans’ breakfast at the Miami County Veteran’s Museum on Wednesday in Troy.
Congressman speaks on national growth, health care