Soul food and jazz


Lincoln CC event closes Black History Month

By Cody Willoughby - cwilloughby@aimmediamidwest.com



Cody Willoughby | Troy Daily News Karter, 4 months, of Troy enjoys the music with Jacob Schmitz and Destiny Lucas during “Soul Food and Jazz” at Lincoln Community Center in Troy.

Cody Willoughby | Troy Daily News Karter, 4 months, of Troy enjoys the music with Jacob Schmitz and Destiny Lucas during “Soul Food and Jazz” at Lincoln Community Center in Troy.


Cody Willoughby | Troy Daily News Brooklyn native Eddie Osborne wails on the saxophone during “Soul Food and Jazz” on Saturday at Lincoln Community Center in Troy.


TROY — Black History Month came to a toe-tapping close at Lincoln Community Center on Saturday with their special celebration, Soul Food and Jazz, which offered dinner and live music to members of the community at no charge.

“We made Soul Food and Jazz a Black History Month event in 2014,” said Shane Carter, executive director at Lincoln. “At the end of the month, we like to do something on Saturday night. My goal and objective is to bring people out from the community and let them fellowship and spend time together. We want to be able to end the month on a high note and have some fun.”

According to Carter, Soul Food and Jazz offers a special opportunity each year to bring positive exposure to the center.

“From what I’ve learned throughout Black History Month, many of our events are focused on history and on our youth, and people tend to be busy and aren’t able to make it,” Carter said. “Holding an event on Saturday that’s free and open to the public gets a good amount of people into the building, and allows us to expose some of the programs we offer.”

The smorgasbord of complimentary food available to attendants was a combination of catered items and potluck efforts.

“We told people if they had a favorite family dish, bring it out and share it with the community,” Carter exclaimed.

The evening’s live music was provided by Brooklyn native and Middletown resident Eddie Osborne, who offered jazz performances on the saxophone and flute.

“This is the third year in a row we’ve had him in, and the second for Black History Month,” said executive director Shane Carter, of guest Eddie Osborne. “I took notice of him at an event down in Dayton, and I was definitely impressed by him. I reached out to him, and we’ve been working together since.”

“Eddie moved to Middletown in 2001,” said manager Theata Lambert-Tennon. “He’d always wanted to pursue a career in music, and had opened for some big names, but gave it up for a while to raise his daughter. She’s now 23 and doing extremely well. I met him about three years ago, and he needed a manager. His music touched my heart, and knowing that he gave up his love to raise his daughter, I wanted to do whatever I could.”

“I’m flattered to be asked back once again,” Osborne confirmed. “I’m just enthusiastic for these people to have a nice time. It’s a blessed place to be.”

For more information, visit www.lcctroy.com, or find Lincoln Community Center and Eddie Osborne on Facebook.

Cody Willoughby | Troy Daily News Karter, 4 months, of Troy enjoys the music with Jacob Schmitz and Destiny Lucas during “Soul Food and Jazz” at Lincoln Community Center in Troy.
https://www.tdn-net.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/21/2018/02/web1_SoulFood1-1.jpgCody Willoughby | Troy Daily News Karter, 4 months, of Troy enjoys the music with Jacob Schmitz and Destiny Lucas during “Soul Food and Jazz” at Lincoln Community Center in Troy.

Cody Willoughby | Troy Daily News Brooklyn native Eddie Osborne wails on the saxophone during “Soul Food and Jazz” on Saturday at Lincoln Community Center in Troy.
https://www.tdn-net.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/21/2018/02/web1_SoulFood2-1.jpgCody Willoughby | Troy Daily News Brooklyn native Eddie Osborne wails on the saxophone during “Soul Food and Jazz” on Saturday at Lincoln Community Center in Troy.
Lincoln CC event closes Black History Month

By Cody Willoughby

cwilloughby@aimmediamidwest.com

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