Wayfinding project paints town navy blue


By Melanie Yingst - myingst@aimmediamidwest.com



Cody Willoughby | Troy Daily News Oscar Lewis of Tipp City’s S&G Painting Contractors, Inc. re-paints a lamppost located on South Market Street near the southwest quadrant of the Public Square on Wednesday in Troy. The painting contractor has been hired to convert downtown signage, lampposts, grates, water fountains, benches, and other metal fixtures from green to blue. The project will continue downtown during fair-weather days through the month of October.

Cody Willoughby | Troy Daily News Oscar Lewis of Tipp City’s S&G Painting Contractors, Inc. re-paints a lamppost located on South Market Street near the southwest quadrant of the Public Square on Wednesday in Troy. The painting contractor has been hired to convert downtown signage, lampposts, grates, water fountains, benches, and other metal fixtures from green to blue. The project will continue downtown during fair-weather days through the month of October.


Cody Willoughby | Troy Daily News Oscar Lewis of Tipp City’s S&G Painting Contractors, Inc. puts the finishing touches on a lamppost located on South Market Street near the southwest quadrant of the Public Square on Wednesday in Troy. The painting contractor has been hired to convert downtown signage, lampposts, grates, water fountains, benches, and various other metal fixtures from green to blue. The project will continue downtown during fair-weather days through the month of October.


TROY — With half of its funding from a grant from the Troy Foundation’s general fund, the city of Troy began this week installing and painting the city’s fixtures navy blue as part of its wayfinding project.

The Troy Foundation granted $47,990.44 to the initial project, according to the award letter to the city in March 2017.

The total cost of the project will be approximately $90,000 with the city of Troy contributing the rest of the funds.

A breakdown of the project’s total cost was initially estimated at $109,640. Director of Public Service and Safety Patrick Titterington said the city was able to save approximately $19,000 due to lower than anticipated design and labor costs.

The bulk of the project’s cost is the installation of 31 signs, which is estimated to cost $24,180.

Other estimated costs for the wayfinding project include: design for the signage $11,650; seven directional signs $4,024; three gateway signs $3,454; nine parking directional signs $5,343; 12 walk/bike signs $5,416; painting the kiosks on the Public Square $2,780; refurbish entry way signs $7,500; pole replacement materials $4,900; painting of the traffic poles with lights $11,000; paint materials, $4,900; paint equipment, $3,500; cross walk poles $1,500; paint tree base grates $8,000; painting of electrical boxes, benches; light bollards, light poles, water fountains, the clock, bike racks and arches is estimated to cost approximately $12,500.

The project came to light during the city’s bid for America’s Best Communities contest and its local communication focus groups, according to the grant application written by Titterington.

“One of the items highlighted throughout the initiatives identified by our ABC planning groups was to provide connectivity to our residents and visitors to introduce them to opportunities and direction within the downtown and river corridor,” the grant application said. The city of Troy hired Olivine Design Studio, a local firm, to provide wayfinding strategies and signage concepts for visitors and residents of Troy. The grant application also states the signage purpose will be to drive residents and visitors to the downtown area and riverfront and to “connect all of our ‘gems’ by way of signage.”

The signs will vary on location, pointing visitors to Hobart Arena, the police station, Miami County Courthouse, Troy City Hall, the Troy-Miami County Library, historic downtown and shopping and dining areas. The signage will be located in the city parking lots and areas, including the city’s recreational trail and Adams Street Bridge.

Cody Willoughby | Troy Daily News Oscar Lewis of Tipp City’s S&G Painting Contractors, Inc. re-paints a lamppost located on South Market Street near the southwest quadrant of the Public Square on Wednesday in Troy. The painting contractor has been hired to convert downtown signage, lampposts, grates, water fountains, benches, and other metal fixtures from green to blue. The project will continue downtown during fair-weather days through the month of October.
https://www.tdn-net.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/21/2018/09/web1_Painter-1-.jpgCody Willoughby | Troy Daily News Oscar Lewis of Tipp City’s S&G Painting Contractors, Inc. re-paints a lamppost located on South Market Street near the southwest quadrant of the Public Square on Wednesday in Troy. The painting contractor has been hired to convert downtown signage, lampposts, grates, water fountains, benches, and other metal fixtures from green to blue. The project will continue downtown during fair-weather days through the month of October.

Cody Willoughby | Troy Daily News Oscar Lewis of Tipp City’s S&G Painting Contractors, Inc. puts the finishing touches on a lamppost located on South Market Street near the southwest quadrant of the Public Square on Wednesday in Troy. The painting contractor has been hired to convert downtown signage, lampposts, grates, water fountains, benches, and various other metal fixtures from green to blue. The project will continue downtown during fair-weather days through the month of October.
https://www.tdn-net.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/21/2018/09/web1_Painter2.jpgCody Willoughby | Troy Daily News Oscar Lewis of Tipp City’s S&G Painting Contractors, Inc. puts the finishing touches on a lamppost located on South Market Street near the southwest quadrant of the Public Square on Wednesday in Troy. The painting contractor has been hired to convert downtown signage, lampposts, grates, water fountains, benches, and various other metal fixtures from green to blue. The project will continue downtown during fair-weather days through the month of October.

By Melanie Yingst

myingst@aimmediamidwest.com