Hayner premieres a gallery in stitches


By Cody Willoughby - cwilloughby@aimmediamidwest.com



Provided photo “Butterfly Rest Stop,” an original quilt designed by artist Debra Bentley, which is now on display in the exhibit, “Still in Stitches,” at Troy-Hayner Cultural Center.

Provided photo “Butterfly Rest Stop,” an original quilt designed by artist Debra Bentley, which is now on display in the exhibit, “Still in Stitches,” at Troy-Hayner Cultural Center.


Provided photo “Morning Glory for Georgia,” an original quilt designed by artist Pam Geisel, which is now on display in the exhibit, “Still in Stitches,” at Troy-Hayner Cultural Center.


TROY — The Troy-Hayner Cultural Center is set to premiere its first exhibit of 2019, titled “Still in Stitches.”

The exhibit will feature over 30 original quilts crafted by 16 members of the Miami Valley Art Quilt Network. An opening reception for the exhibit will be held on Sunday at Hayner from 2-4 p.m, and is free and open to the public.

“These are not your grandmother’s quilts,” said exhibit coordinator Leona Sargent. “These are each original works of art. Several of them are three-dimensional. Some of them have other types of objects worked into them. Every piece in the exhibit is very unique.”

The Miami Valley Art Quilt Network (MVAQN) was formed in autumn 1992 by weaver and fiber artist Gerry Fogarty, of Yellow Springs, and art teacher and costume designer Sharon Weitner, of Oakwood. Fogarty and Weitner invited other artists interested in fostering enthusiasm for the growing art form of non-traditional quilts.

The group reorganized itself in summer 2007 with the goal of inspiring and supporting the efforts of its members, providing opportunities to exhibit collective works and take advantage of art education opportunites in the community.

Membership in MVAQN is open to fiber artists, or those wishing to explore the world of art quilting.

The group focuses on the creation of original designs in fiber, usually in quilt form. The only guideline for art quilts is that they consist of three layers — a top, a back, and a filling. Quilts are constructed of traditional commercial cotton fabrics, hand-dyed silk, rayon, wool, non-woven fabrics, and painted fabrics.

“When visitors come and look at the exhibit, they’ll find these artists come from a variety of different backgrounds and each have different inspirations,” Sargent exclaimed. “It’s really cool how these folks come together to form a group and learn from each other, gain inspiration from each other, and support each other as fellow artists.”

The exhibit will be on display at Hayner during regular hours through Sunday, Feb. 17.

For more information on the Miami Valley Art Quilt Network, visit www.mvaqn.com, or find them on Facebook. For more information on Hayner events, visit www.troyhayner.org.

Provided photo “Butterfly Rest Stop,” an original quilt designed by artist Debra Bentley, which is now on display in the exhibit, “Still in Stitches,” at Troy-Hayner Cultural Center.
https://www.tdn-net.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/21/2019/01/web1_Bentley_Butterfly-Rest-Stop-1-1-.jpgProvided photo “Butterfly Rest Stop,” an original quilt designed by artist Debra Bentley, which is now on display in the exhibit, “Still in Stitches,” at Troy-Hayner Cultural Center.

Provided photo “Morning Glory for Georgia,” an original quilt designed by artist Pam Geisel, which is now on display in the exhibit, “Still in Stitches,” at Troy-Hayner Cultural Center.
https://www.tdn-net.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/21/2019/01/web1_Geisel_MorningGloriesForGeorgia.jpgProvided photo “Morning Glory for Georgia,” an original quilt designed by artist Pam Geisel, which is now on display in the exhibit, “Still in Stitches,” at Troy-Hayner Cultural Center.

By Cody Willoughby

cwilloughby@aimmediamidwest.com